Tuesday, 16 April 2013

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems Biography

Source(google.com.pk)

I haven’t posted anything recently about Poetry Under the Paintings, and since I just sent out the announcement for the Valentine’s edition to my local Facebook poets and poetry lovers, I thought I’d pass along to you the video I included for them. It’s one that I recorded on YouTube three years ago, but had never uploaded to the blog. In fact I had accidentally kept it marked private until after Valentine’s day that year, so I’m not sure how long it sulked alone in obscurity before I marked it public and it started getting views. It didn’t get many, but I was surprised to find a video curation site had picked it up where it garnered a few more hits. They even added some helpful links to the poet, Wendy Cope.

I made a few tweaks, cut out an intro that was too long, and now include it for you below, along with two other poems by Cope, who is fast becoming a new favorite of mine. She’s something of a poetic sprite at spoofing other poets, and their poems, and she brings a welcoming and comfortable playfulness to traditional forms. This one makes reference to the bargaining of hearts in Sir Philip Sydney‘s sonnet “Song From Arcadia.” You’ll recognize it from your 11th grade English lit class, I promise you. Wendy’s parody is written in the voice of the fictitious poet Jason Strugnell who writes for her in her collection Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis. I’ll include the text of both poems beneath the video.he third and final video selection is of Wendy Cope herself reading an approachable, but much more serious poem entitled “Spared,” from her Two Cures for Love collection. This time I have included the WorldCat.org link so that you can look for the book in your local library, or failing to find it, encourage them to pick up a copy for their shelves. Again, you’ll find the text of the poem below the video.

If you enjoy these you can find several more by clicking here, here and here. That should get you nicely started on enjoying the works of Wendy Cope.

We usually meet at Faustina’s Gallery in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania on the second Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm. This time it will be the first Thursday in order to avoid messing up your date night on February 14th.  If you cannot join us, I’ll understand, but I’ll continue to update you from time to time here about our local activities. After all, a blogger formerly known as Angry Ricky actually did manage to make it one night before he headed overseas. Unfortunately I missed that meeting! I won’t let that happen again, so if you are swinging through central PA, give me a shout, or better yet, your best barbaric yawp!

More love poems, serious, spiteful and silly coming soon.

And since the piece is a love poem, or perhaps an anti-love poem (which for some is even more appropriate for Valentines Day), I thought we should include a few more from this poet. The second video is from the king of online poetry readers, Tom O’Bedlam, of YouTube’s SpokeVerse channel. You’ll probably recognize his deep, distinctive voice. He’s got a brilliant knack for picking the right poems to record, and he’s been damned kind and helpful to me. His channel is a wealth of audio for poetry buffs, educators and lovers of the spoken word. If you haven’t already, please spend some time enjoying his work. You’ll thank me."If ever two were made for each other surely it is love and poetry: the infinite variety of love meeting the boundless capacity of poetry to embrace it. There is something both sweet and intense about all aspects of romantic love, a combination that is ideally suited to poetry's marriage of the music of speech with compressed content. This is true from love's first blush through to its heady consummation.

"It is a surprise, however, to find that the straightforward romantic paean is comparatively rare amongst great love poems. Perhaps this is because the self-satisfied I'm-so-happy-now-we-twain-are-one approach can cloy. For the most part, great love poems are either ones of wily courtship, unrequited love, or the bitterest regret. There is something delicious about these marginal states in which Desire (for it is he) is constantly unsatisfied, confounded or denied. I would hazard a shaft that it is just this strange quality of desire to persist in the face of its own negation that we find compelling. With that in mind, and with the exception of the Shakespeare (he seems to be able to carry it off), all the poems I've chosen, in no particular order, are of this type. "


Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems


Sorry Love Poems

Sorry Love Poems



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